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Local Landscaper Provides Lawncare Advice; City Announces Leaf Pickup Plan
Posted on: 10/18/2013
By  Andy Rex
 
When it comes to lawn and plant care, fall is the time to make sure everything is ready for winter. So what kinds of things can do you right now?  

WMOA News spoke with Russ Thomson of Thomson’s Landscaping, who says that, for starters, it’s a good time to fertilize your lawn, but it needs to be the right type of fertilizer…
 
“If you put fertilizer on now, it should not be high in nitrogen, but high in the other numbers.  It will keep your lawn green through the season.  But, what you’ll really see is, next spring it will start off way ahead of what it would normally do.  It makes it look better through the winter, and gives you a better start next spring.”
 
Thomson says dead leaves can provide some insulation to yards in the winter, but he prefers getting them off the lawn…  
 
“If you grind them up and spread them so they’re not all in one location, they’ll decompose and add nutrients. But in the process it will take nitrogen out of the soil.  I much prefer to get them out of the way – put them on a garden somewhere, till them in, take them to a landfill – whatever.”
 
If you do any fall pruning of perennials and shrubs, Thomson says to be careful about which ones…
 
“Most plants you can trim anytime. However, if you trim spring-flowering shrubs and trees now, they’ve already set their flower bud for next year.  It won’t hurt the plant to trim it, but what you’ll see is you’re cutting off the flowers for next year.  For example -- forsythias, rhododendrons, azalea, dogwoods – those buds are right there.  You trim the tree right now, you won’t have any flowers next spring.”
 
One other tip: Thompson says to make sure any ponds are cleaned out prior to wintertime because, if they aren’t clean and the pond freezes, methane gas can develop and kill the fish.
 
- - - - -
 
Speaking of leaves, the city of Marietta (a.k.a. Tree City) says you can now drop off bagged leaves at one of four locations: Indian Acres Park, Buckeye Park, Lookout Park or the Greenleaf compost facility at 800 State Route 821.
 
Officials caution residents to not place anything but bagged leaves at these sites. Locations will be closed if they're abused by people dumping trash or other yard debris.
 
City crews will begin streetside leaf pickup on Monday, November 4. Leaves should be raked to between the curb and sidewalk for pick up. Crews will not collect bagged leaves.
 
If you have questions, call City Hall at 373-1387.
 
 
 
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